Pin It
Saturday, April 30th, 2011

Korean Craft: Make a Traditional Sam Taeguk Fan

multicultural-children's-crafts/ Korean-Children's-Day

The Sam Taeguk symbol is found on traditional Korean fans. It is a variation of the Taeguk symbol found on the Korean national flag. The Taeguk is comprised of two colors, red and blue. The red represents heaven and the blue represents earth. The symbol represents harmony similar to a yin yang symbol. The Sam Taeguk includes yellow to represent humanity. The Sam Taegeuk also appeared in the official logo of the 1988 Summer Olympics.

To make your own Sam Taeguk Fan, you can follow these directions below.

For more Korean crafts for kids, check out the end of this article!


Paint (blue, yellow and red)
Popsicle sticks
Template for the fan (click here for the Sam Taeguk template.


Print out the template and cut it out. Let the kids paint the template with yellow, red and blue paints. Once dry, glue a popsicle stick to the back, and there you have it—your very own traditional Korean fan!

Submitted by Mama King over at the kid’s crafting website, Four Kings.

If you are looking for more Korean crafts, check out these:
Make a sogo drum–a “lollipop”-shaped drum often used by children in Korea
Make a Lotus Lantern

Need a fun Korean-themed book for kids?
Check out Bee Bim Bop.

Need a kid-friendly Korean recipe?
Check out this simple recipe for Hoddeok

© 2011 – 2013, Stephanie Meade. All rights reserved.

More Great Stuff You'll Love:

A Different World: No Longer Brown in White America

Is it racist to not want to raise your kids in white America?

Family History

Who knew that becoming a mother merged our histories of loss and grief

9 Things You Should Never Say to Adoptive Parents

Have you made any of these mistakes?


Stephanie is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of InCultureParent. She has two Moroccan-American daughters (ages 5 and 6), whom she is raising, together with her husband, bilingual in Arabic and English at home, while also introducing Spanish. After many moves worldwide, she currently lives in Berkeley, California.

Leave us a comment!

  1. CommentsInCultureParent | Korean Drum Craft   |  Sunday, 17 February 2013 at 4:57 pm

    […] When we decided to run a sogo workshop for kids at the community cultural exchange on South street in Philadelphia, our first challenge was: how can we MAKE a sogo with kids that they can then play right away? One that is not dripping with paint? We also wanted a low price point for materials. Oh, and we wanted the drums…to not be very loud. Loud enough to give the kids using them some immediate feedback, but not “UGH”-level loud. We thought everyone would appreciate that. I think we came up with quite an excellent solution. When I made my exemplar drum, I began literally not knowing if I would finish or not. An hour later, I had made an entire drum, without leaving my kitchen for materials. It’s not gorgeous or elegant…but it gets the job done! Materials Oatmeal canister (42 oz!) Clear packing tape Masking tape Colored “duck” tape Drawing or construction paper Marker to decorate drum head A short length of drinking straw or organic stick Disposable bamboo chopsticks A little bit of yarn or tinsel for making a tassel Instructions Take your 42 oz oatmeal canister and cut rounds about an inch wide. you can get a lot of drum frames out of one oatmeal container! Take clear packing tape and encircle the entire drum “frame” with it. This first layer is the most difficult and the most important–you must maintain the round shape of the frame and not let the tape squeeze it out of shape. Loose is better than tight. You can make tighter layers later. Next layer: masking tape. Cover it all–both “heads” and the edge. After another layer of clear packing tape, you’ll want to make a small slit in what will be the “bottom” of the vertical drum head. Your handle will go here and it’s easier to make that little hole now. Cut two four-inch rounds of paper–wrapping paper, coloring paper, construction paper. Your child can decorate these as they see fit. Affix them with a bit of tape on the backs of them, to each side of the drum. Take your colored duck tape and wrap it around the edge of the drum, leaving the slit opening for your handle. To make your handle, wrap a set of disposable bamboo chopsticks in colored duck tape. Insert handle. A little glue would not hurt. Use smaller strips of your duck tape to further attach your handle to your drum head. Now make a small hole directly opposite your handle, at the top of the drum. Insert a short length of drinking straw or even a little piece of stick, if you want a more organic look. Again, a little glue is fine. Attach some tinsel or yarn to the straw/stick at the top of the drum for a tassel. Use another set of chopsticks wrapped in duck tape to make a stick for hitting your sogo. And there you go–fast, cheap and out of control! For more Korean crafts, be sure to check out these: If you are looking for more Korean crafts, check out these: Make some cool lotus lanterns Make a traditional Sam Taeguk Fan […]

  2. CommentsInCultureParent | Lotus Lanterns for Wesak (Buddha Day)   |  Sunday, 17 February 2013 at 5:00 pm

    […] out these: Make a sogo–a “lollipop”-shaped drum often used by children in Korea Make a traditional Sam Taeguk Fan Suggested links Wesak in Sri Lanka Korean Character Paper Luminaries (not only do you get […]

  3. CommentsInCultureParent | Korean Children’s Day: May 5   |  Monday, 22 April 2013 at 2:23 pm

    […] “lollipop”-shaped drum often used by children in Korea Make a Lotus Lantern Make a San Tageuk fan Need a fun Korean-themed book for kids? Check out Bee Bim Bop. Need a kid-friendly Korean recipe? […]

Notify me of follow-up comments via e-mail.
Or leave your email address and click here to receive email notifications of new comments without leaving a comment yourself.

Get weekly updates right in your inbox so you don't miss out!

Why I Travel 13 Hours Alone with My Kids Every Chance I Get

Travelling with children, while definitely more of a mission, contradicts the old saying that “life is about the journey, not the destination.”

A Diverse Book for Preschoolers in Celebration of Multicultural Children's Book Day

A book that honestly and simply celebrates the every day diversity that children experience.

Why My African Feminist Mother Gave Me the Identity of My Father's Tribe

She gave me an identity so different from her own.

2 Children’s Books about Jamaica

Explore Jamaica with your child.

Costa Rica with Kids: Two Weeks of Family Travel

Two weeks of Pura Vida in a country with so much to offer families.

Should I Worry about My Child's Accent in Her Foreign Language?

See why Dr. Gupta takes offense to this question and where children learn accents from

How to raise trilingual kids when exposure to Dad's language is limited

My kids only get 1-2 hours of the minority language per day-help!

What Cultural Norms Around Bare Feet Taught This Mother in Guatemala

Her baby's bare feet ended up being a lesson on poverty and privilege.
[…] the breastfeeding culture in Mongolia compared to America. Did you have any idea that something as simple as breastfeeding attitudes can […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
My mother born in the 1930's is originally from the northern part of Germany. I am in my mid fifties and have a terrible relationship with my mother. She is domineering and hurts those where it hurt...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
[…] JC Niala, InCultureParent […...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
[…] […...
From Breastfeeding Around the World
Although humanity is one Man (in a generic sense, including woman)has identified himself endless groups, religious, nationalistic, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, etc. Once you separate ME from YOU on...
From What’s an Asian? Race and Identity for a New Generation
[…] […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
Some great tips here but not many working mothers could feed baby every hour especially if you work in a major multi-nationa...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
So true!!! Thanks for being so honest and self reflective. It's a proof of true characte...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
As a first-time mom I've spent the last two months of my four-month-old's life stressed out about her sleep and I recognize how crazy this is. It's clearly not working for me! I'm wondering how non-...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep

More Crafts