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Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Children’s Books that Travel to Africa

By
Children’s Books that Travel to Africa/ © flickr.com

 

A passport to the second-largest and second-most-populous continent, these picture books will transport children to the landscapes and lifestyles of Africa through enjoyable stories and delightful art.

 

Catch That Goat

 

Catch That Goat!
By
Polly Alakija
Ages: 3+

 

Catch That Goat! takes us to a vibrant street market in Nigeria where little Ayoka is fretting about the family goat that has just absconded from her care. She wanders around asking the vendors on the street—Mama Kudi, Baba Akinade, Auntie Wemimo, Oga and so many more. While they haven’t seen the goat, they seem bewildered about something else!

 

A hide-and-seek plot and a counting-down lesson are rolled into a simple suspense-filled storyline.  I was thoroughly amused the first time I read this book. Needless to say, my kids find it comical every single time.

 

Author and illustrator, Polly Alakija, is a Montessori teacher who lives (or has lived) in Nigeria with her family and a horde of animals in her own backyard. This justifies the authenticity of the illustrations. They wonderfully capture the sun-drenched market setting. Children, especially in cities, will be intrigued by the sight of women pounding grains or frying snacks on the street side. We also see great detail, like woven baskets, native produce, elaborate storefront signs and bold, cloth patterns. Amidst all this, is a story about a missing goat—this book is a delight, and through a little girl’s awkward predicament, we glimpse a slice of Africa, full of color and chaos!

 

Another West African read and a Nigerian story we love is Amadi’s Snowman written by Katia Novet Saint-Lot and illustrated by DimItrea Tokunbo.

 

 

Mama Panyas Pancakes

 

Mama Panya’s Pancakes – A Village Tale from Kenya
By
Mary and Rich Chamberlin, Illustrated by Julia Cairns
Ages: 4+

 

Similar in theme, “Mama Panya’s Pancakes” is yet another journey to Africa. However, this time we’ve landed in Kenya!

 

“Mama Panya sang as she kicked sand with her bare feet, dousing the breakfast fire.”

 

Thus begins the story as Mama Panya prepares for a quick walk to the market with her son Adika. As they discuss Mama’s few coins and the possibility of shopping for ingredients to make pancakes that night, Adika invites Mzee Odolo to join them for dinner. The list of invitees grows as Adika calls out to Sawandi and Naiman shepherding cattle, his school friend Gamila at the plantain stand, Bwana Zawenna selling flour and Rafiki Kaya at the spice table. But Mama Panya is extremely worried. Will she have enough ingredients to make pancakes for all? But a lovely gesture from the guests alleviates her concerns.

 

The story presents the big-heartedness among friends and neighbors, a quality more prevalent in villages than in modern times.  I realized this when my four-year-old son found the whole thing hard to digest as he drew a parallel in his own life. He ended up with, “How come we don’t do that, amma?” But this was all the more why I loved reading this book to my children!

 

The illustrations are typical of glorious ethnic art, with bright hues and busy patterns. A note on Kenyan lifestyle, a map, Mama Panya’s pancake recipe, a couple of pages on the foliage and animals we see in the artwork, and the meaning and pronunciation of Kiswahili greetings, adds value and interest to the book.

 

More from East Africa, the Elizabeti series written by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen and illustrated by Christy Hale has stories set in the backdrop of a Tanzanian village.

 

© 2012 – 2013, Meera Sriram. All rights reserved.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Meera Sriram has been reviewing and recommending diverse children’s literature for about ten years now. She loves to pass on a title or an author to a friend (or a stranger, for that matter). Picture books particularly appeal to the inner child in her. She moved to the U.S. at the turn of the millennium from India. After graduate studies and a brief stint as an electrical engineer, she decided to express herself in other creative ways, primarily through writing. She has co-authored four books for children, all published in India. Her writing interests include people and cultures, nature, and life’s everyday moments. She also runs an early literacy program for toddlers and preschoolers in her neighboring communities. She lives in Berkeley, CA, with her husband and two kids. Curling up to read a good book with her children is something she looks forward to every day. She constantly fantasizes about a world with no boundaries over hot chai, to help her stay warm in foggy Northern California. More at www.meerasriram.com.

Leave us a comment!

5 Comments
  1. CommentsAisha G of HartlynKids   |  Thursday, 08 November 2012 at 1:55 pm

    I always love Meera’s articles and this is a great one and helpful resource!

  2. CommentsNicola   |  Thursday, 08 November 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Great reviews of some favourite Barefoot Books – we love Mama Panya especially for the recipe!

  3. CommentsMeera Sriram   |  Friday, 09 November 2012 at 9:44 am

    Thank you Aisha, that’s nice to know :) Thanks Nicola!

  4. CommentsInCultureParent | Ten Reasons Parents Should Read Multicultural Books to Kids   |  Friday, 15 February 2013 at 1:26 pm

    […] Not all of us can travel wherever we like, whenever we want. But books can take us to faraway place while still in the comfort of our home. Publishers like Hartlyn Kids and Itchee Feet offer books […]

  5. CommentsInCultureParent | Favorite Multicultural Children’s Books of 2012 – Old and New   |  Thursday, 23 May 2013 at 5:35 am

    […] “Catch That Goat” […]









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