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Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

Teaching a Language to Children Through Music

By
Teaching a Language to Children with Music-InCultureParent/ © matka_Wariatka - Fotolia.com

Did you know that music can be beneficial to language learners because it stimulates parts of the brain conductive to learning a foreign language?

 

I recently began researching data that supported my personal belief that music is the perfect  vehicle for learning a foreign language, and I stumbled upon a book called “Language is Music” by Susanna Zaraysky. From her book I learned that the neurological links between language and music are many but the basic thing to remember is that music activates both the right and the left side of the brain, so if you remember something to a tune, you are more likely to recall the information than if you just read it or heard it spoken. As an example, I remember putting to a tune the names of the Latin declensions and the endings when I was in high school and still to this day, I can recite them thanks to the catchy tune I invented!

 

Since the Italian immersion music classes I teach cater to both native and non-native speakers, I try to use a variety of mediums to teach both language and culture. I use a lot of folk dancing, puppets, flannel board stories, as well as sing alongs and play alongs. One of Suzanna Zaraysky’s recommendations is to watch music videos which may facilitate an understanding of the song’s meaning. This is particularly useful for visual learners because they can see the story being told by the lyrics and match new vocabulary to the images on the screen. While this might be the perfect tool to use at home, the way I translate that into my classes is through the use of “song books”. These are books that we sing instead of read.

 

For my Italian classes I really like the Gallucci collection of traditional children’s songs. One of my favorites is “La Gatta” which comes with a CD sung by the songwriter himself, Gino Paoli. The children also really like “I Due Liocorni” and “Mi Piace il Mondo.” These books can be hard to find but I recently found a San Francisco Bay Area Italian online bookstore called “Libreria Pino” with a great collection. Good picture books are also naturally appealing to young children and offer lots of opportunities for conversation. A great conversation starter is to simply ask the children to tell us what they see in the pictures, “Che cosa vedi?”

 

Although I still have a lot to learn as a language immersion teacher, I am confident that music can help the young and old enjoy the pleasure of learning a language while being immersed in the cultural nuances of the country where the language is spoken. I encourage you to discover song books from your own native language and you’ll be surprised to find how many are out there and the joy they bring to the children we love so much. The songs will bring back childhood memories and will become something you can share and pass down to your children.

© 2012 – 2013, Viola Pellegrini. All rights reserved.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Viola Pellegrini, born and raised in Florence (Italy), holds a Bachelor's Degree in Child Development from Mills College. She has received extensive training in music education from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and has attended teacher trainings in both Suzuki Method and Orff. She has also taught preschool for seven years and has been a private music instructor for the past ten years. Viola currently teaches multicultural music and movement to young children and families. She hopes to inspire children to develop a lifelong enjoyment and appreciation for music and cultures from around the world. Viola plays violin, piano, guitar and recorder, and is constantly adding new instruments to her repertoire. In addition to English, she is fluent in Italian and German, and is working on her Spanish. In her free time she enjoys attending music and dance events, cooking, practicing yoga and traveling the world with her husband.

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1 Comment
  1. CommentsJim   |  Thursday, 06 February 2014 at 12:12 am

    Songs are very powerful in language learning. No doubt about it. We all know how easy it is to get a song ‘stuck’ in our heads!









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