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Thursday, March 28th, 2013

How to Teach Kids about Race and Social Justice: One Teacher’s Approach

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How to Teach Kids about Race/ Shutterstock

When it came time to talk about Martin Luther King Jr. to my Kindergarten students, I found myself struggling to communicate who he was. I wanted to convey the themes that stood out to me the most about Dr. King: courage, standing up for a community, and using peaceful means to bring about big, important social changes. But I didn’t know what was developmentally appropriate for five and six year olds. Should I tell them about his assassination?  Should I talk to them about race and racism? Would learning the truth about racism and segregation be too much for them to handle and create divisions in my diverse classroom? Would my students feel burdened or overwhelmed with this information?

 

For years, I tried to talk about Dr. King without talking about racism. I thought my students would understand the themes of courage, social justice and empathy by talking in general terms about Dr. King’s dream of an inclusive world. But our conversations in class did not convey these themes and my students did not seem to understand the significance of who Dr. King was and what he did. And, inevitably, some of the truth would come out—through a comment from a student who had prior knowledge about the story, or a conversation on the playground between a kindergartener and an older child. I realized that it was my responsibility to tell this story in a way that would effectively communicate the themes I most wanted my students to understand and, in order to do that, I would have to look deeper into our curriculum and face my own discomfort around talking about racism with my students.

 

I met with my kindergarten team and began an inquiry into our curriculum.  We asked ourselves:  how can we teach the themes of courage, justice, inclusivity and making change through peaceful means to our young students? And how can we do this in a way that is developmentally appropriate and includes all the voices in our classrooms?

 

The result of this inquiry has led to the “Peaceful Changemakers” curriculum in kindergarten, and, now, influencing the way that first through fourth grade teachers talk about issues of environmentalism, civil and human rights. Through this curriculum, students learn about many people who work toward making the world a better place through peaceful means.  We realized that in order for our students to have a deeper understanding of Dr. King we would need to integrate the ideas around making big, important changes into our curriculum. We would need to start talking about these themes months before Dr. King’s birthday, so that our students could practice exploring the ideas and having conversations about what it means to stand up for a community and make change before they learned about Dr. King.

 

We start by studying Dr. Seuss’s the Lorax, and we call the Lorax a “changemaker” because he spoke for the trees. Students answer the following questions about the Lorax: What was the problem he faced? Who was involved or affected? Why was it hard to solve this problem? And was it solved? From there, we learn about Dr. Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan scientist who won the Nobel Peace Prize for planting trees in Kenya. As we learn about these changemakers, students take action to solve problems in their local community.  We work to restore the watershed by planting native trees at a nearby creek and go on trash walks through the local parks. We hang signs around their school educating our school community about how trash on the ground eventually makes its way into the ocean.

 

Students also honor changemakers from their own families and communities, and family members come into the classroom to present their changemakers. Some of these changemakers are tutors in schools, work in orphanages in other countries, educate others about the importance of reusing and recycling, or turn parking lots into neighborhood parks.

 

There were also important changes we made to the discussion of Dr. King himself. Through our research, we discovered that it is developmentally appropriate to skip the part of the story around Dr. King’s death; students do not need to know that he was assassinated in order to appreciate his work. I had noticed that when my students learned he was killed, they would often focus on this violent image more than on any other aspect of his life work. And, without the larger unit in which we explore many people who work for change, students would feel burdened and overwhelmed with this information. Now, if my students learn about the assassination from an older sibling or from an outside conversation, I can point to our Changemaker Wall on which we display all the changemakers we have learned about, both famous and not, and remind them that there are so many people working, as Dr. King did, to make a difference.

 

We also learned it was important not to skip the part about racism and segregation. Using our changemakers framework, where we ask specific questions of each of our changemakers, our students need to know what the problem was in order to think about how to solve it. There is a universality among all the changemakers in that they all work to make a difference and solve big problems, but in order for our students to grasp the significance of this universality they also have to understand the specific problems. Otherwise, they cannot appreciate the courage it takes to solve the problems we face.

 

We also discovered that our students needed support in developing a basic understanding of skin color differences and language they can use to be inclusive with one another. To this end, students mix paint to find their skin tones, write poems about their skin, and listen to many stories about the different shades of our skin. Talking openly about race and racism with our students is also important so that they can recognize and interrupt bias when they see it. They can also more fully appreciate the work of Dr. King and other changemakers in fighting against segregation and racism.

 

Now, when it comes time to talk about Martin Luther King Jr. in kindergarten, the students are able to focus on the big ideas around courage, social justice and making peaceful change. They have a deeper understanding of their similarities and differences and a greater appreciation for the importance of standing up for a community and working toward inclusivity and equality.   They recognize they can be changemakers too.
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Hey InCultureParent Community! If you like Madeleine’s ideas and curriculum then you can vote for her in the Great American Teach-Off where she is a finalist to win a $10,000 classroom grant. Here’s a little more about it:

 

As a kindergarten teacher who is instilling empathy and other foundational changemaking skills in her students at Prospect Sierra Elementary School, in El Cerrito, California, Madeleine knows that when young people master the skill of empathy, the more likely they are to work effectively in teams, become strong leaders, problem-solve and take initiative. Madeleine is one of four finalists in the The Great American Teach-Off, which awards a $10,000 grant to the United States’ most innovative teachers.  If she wins the classroom grant she plans to work on a local frog habitat restoration project in El Cerrito, CA, as well as partner with an elementary school in Ghana, West Africa to work on peaceful change together.  You can view the video for Madeleine here as well as vote.

 

The next round of eliminations will be held on Monday, April 1st, when we find out if she goes on to the finals!  You can vote every day.

© 2013, Madeleine Rogin. All rights reserved.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


A Change Leader for Ashoka’s “Start Empathy” Initiative and Changemaker Schools Network, Madeleine Rogin has been an educator of young children for the past 13 years. She currently teaches Kindergarten and Dance at Prospect Sierra School in El Cerrito, CA. In addition to teaching, Madeleine serves as the Diversity and Inclusion Representative for the Elementary School at Prospect Sierra and recently delivered a talk on “Teaching About Martin Luther King, Jr. in Kindergarten” at the National People of Color Conference. She received a BA from The New School in Urban Education and Writing and an MA in Dance from the University of New Mexico with a focus on African Dance. Madeleine can be reached at madeleine@prospectsierra.org.

Leave us a comment!

5 Comments
  1. CommentsLisa Nelson   |  Saturday, 30 March 2013 at 1:00 am

    What a fantastic article! I love how you use the different activities with the children. Fun learning! I love it! Thank you for this!

  2. Commentspeaceful changemakers | mulatto diaries   |  Thursday, 04 April 2013 at 4:06 am

    […] By Madeleine Rogin   via […]

  3. CommentsGlenn Robinson   |  Wednesday, 10 April 2013 at 2:37 pm

    Excellent post. I can also say that in all my years of school, the only class where we touched on the topic of race relations or segregation or civil rights was in college in sociology class – and not that heavy there. Intro to sociology spends a lot of time teaching concepts and about the founders of sociology. One would think I would have learned something in history classes. Not really. Nothing substantial. Most of the important history and social justice topics I learned on my own through the library (500 Nations DVD series, PBS Civil Rights DVD series), and internet research.

  4. CommentsInCultureParent | Preparing our Children for Racism — Part 1   |  Friday, 03 May 2013 at 10:54 am

    […] do not have to tell her all the gory details about racism, but you can still give her generalized rules and ideas about tolerance like “Do not exclude […]

  5. CommentsInCultureParent | How to Talk to Kids About Race: What’s Appropriate for Ages 3-8   |  Tuesday, 14 May 2013 at 10:19 pm

    […] being a white kindergarten teacher and mother of two biracial daughters. I’ve thought a lot about how to lead developmentally appropriate conversations about race with my students and my children, and what it means to be white in the context of talking about race. This article […]









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