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Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Korean Children’s Day: May 5

Korean-Children's-Day/ Kelly West Mars

Children’s Day is a South Korean national holiday celebrating, you guessed right, children. The holiday was created in 1923 by children’s book author Bang Jeong Hwan as a way to honor children since he believed they were the future of the country. Bang Jeong-hwan wrote, “Children are the heroes of tomorrow. May they grow to be gentle, vigorous, and wise.”

In South Korea, Children’s Day is a big deal. Children of all ages are celebrated and the entire community is involved in the festivity. Kids get spoiled by gifts, family fun and their favorite foods. Typically, families celebrate by going to parks, museums, amusement parks, zoos or the movies. If you’re in Seoul, you can head over to the Seoul Grand Children’s Park and not just ride a pony but kids can even ride a camel!

Children’s Day is also celebrated in North Korea but on June 2nd instead. Many other countries worldwide celebrate Children’s Day as well but on varying dates.

If you are looking for some Korean-themed crafts, check out these:
Make a sogo drum–a “lollipop”-shaped drum often used by children in Korea
Make a Lotus Lantern
Make a San Tageuk fan

Need a fun Korean-themed book for kids?
Check out Bee Bim Bop.

Need a kid-friendly Korean recipe?
Check out this simple recipe for Hoddeok

© 2013, The Editors. All rights reserved.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


InCultureParent is an online magazine for parent's raising little global citizens. Centered on global parenting culture and traditions, we feature articles on parenting around the world and on raising multicultural and multilingual children.

Leave us a comment!

2 Comments
  1. CommentsWe Are Young – Children’s Day in South Korea « Ham and Eggs   |  Sunday, 13 January 2013 at 1:35 am

    […] 1923 a children’s author named Bang Jeong Hwan created Children’s Day, Eorini Nal in Korean. Every May 5th the entire country has the day […]

  2. CommentsInCultureParent | Lotus Lanterns for Wesak (Buddha Day)   |  Sunday, 17 February 2013 at 4:57 pm

    […] Wesak is tracked on the lunisolar calendar, and this year falls on the fifth of May, which is also Korean Children’s Day. Paper lanterns shaped like lotus flowers are a common component of the incredible lantern […]









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