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Sunday, March 23rd, 2014

A Year of Multicultural Picture Books for the Global Child

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If you have not been including multicultural books in your reading diet, this is a great beginner’s guide that will last you for the year. The books cover many important and diverse themes like tradition, travel, history, holiday, migration, art and culture. This is a fantastic potpourri of books for children aged three through 12 growing up to be global citizens of tomorrow!

 

Disclaimer: The following books in this article were sent to us as review copies but the decision to review them was all ours: Baba Didi and the Godwits Fly, A is for Activist, Tari—The Little Balinese Dancer, Irena’s Jars of Secrets

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© 2014, Meera Sriram. All rights reserved.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Meera Sriram has been reviewing and recommending diverse children’s literature for over five years now. She loves to pass on a title or an author to a friend (or a stranger, for that matter). Picture books particularly appeal to the inner child in her. She moved to the U.S at the turn of the millennium from India. After graduate studies and a brief stint as an electrical engineer, she decided to express herself in other creative ways, primarily through writing. She has co-authored two books for children, both published in India. Her writing interests include people and cultures, nature and life’s everyday moments. She also does story time for toddlers in her community. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband and two kids. Curling up to read a good book with her little boy and girl is something she looks forward to everyday. She constantly fantasizes about a world with no boundaries over hot chai to help stay warm in foggy Northern California.

Leave us a comment!

3 Comments
  1. CommentsJody   |  Thursday, 27 March 2014 at 4:45 am

    These books sound great and most of the titles are new to me. Thank you so much for sharing!

  2. CommentsMeera Sriram   |  Wednesday, 02 April 2014 at 9:22 am

    Thanks, Jody! So glad you liked them!

  3. CommentsThe-best-ones-in-April | between worlds   |  Monday, 28 April 2014 at 5:09 am

    […] A year of multicultural picture books for the global child by Meera Sriram. “If you have not been including multicultural books in your reading diet, this is a great beginner’s guide that will last you for the year. The books cover many important and diverse themes like tradition, travel, history, holiday, migration, art and culture. This is a fantastic potpourri of books for children aged three through 12 growing up to be global citizens of tomorrow!” […]









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