Articles by The Editors

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

How to raise trilingual kids when exposure to Dad’s language is limited


How to raise trilingual kids when exposure to Dad’s language is limited
Dear Dr Gupta,   I have two kids one is 3.5 and one is 2. My language is Arabic and I only use it to speak to my kids. My wife's language is English, which is her language with our kids, but also she speaks Urdu to her mum and her mum uses Urdu with the kids. We are living in the UK.   To be honest I feel my kids are not picking Arabic as I am out at work and I only talk to them 1 or 2 hours a day, I feel helpless as my language is the number 3 in my kids life, not even number 2 as number 2 is Urdu.  Read more »

Will Three Languages Confuse a Young Child?

Dear Dr. Gupta,   I enjoyed reading some of your replies to people who asked for advice and am hoping you might be able to shed some light on our dilemma.  Read more »

3 Beautiful Children’s Books That Take Place in the Himalayas

  Chandra’s Magic Light By Theresa Heine (Author), Judith Gueyfier (Illustrator)   Chandra's Magic Light: A Story in Nepal combines two things I feel passionately about in one: environmental sustainability and exploring other cultures.  Read more »

Help Us Giveaway a Soccer Ball to Kids in Ethiopia!

  InCultureParent is so excited to support One World Futbol in their mission to bring the healing power of play to youth worldwide through their nearly indestructible soccer/football.  Read more »

Tanabata Festival: July 7

Tanabata is the Japanese star festival. The cultural festival dates back approximately 2000 years and has its roots in a Chinese legend. Princess, Orihime, a weaver, fell in love with a cow herder named Hikoboshi. They were so madly in love that they forgot about their work. As punishment, Orihime's father, the emperor of the heavens, moved the lovers to opposite sides of the Milky Way and allowed them to meet only once a year on the seventh day of the seventh month.  Read more »

Do I Hold My Son Back to Get into the Immersion Program?

Dear Dr. Gupta,   I need some advice.   As a multiracial/multicultural family it's important that my children speak English, Spanish (which I am teaching them) and Korean.   My daughter is in Korean/English dual language program at our local school. My son didn't get in last year (lottery system) as an entering kinder nor did he get in for entering first grade.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Thailand: French, English and Spanish

Meet Javier and Cordelia—a French-American-Mexican couple who are raising kids in Asia after a romance that spanned London and New York City.   Where are you from?   Cordelia: I was born in New York to a French mother, American father.   Javier: Mexico City.   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Cordelia: We live in Thailand.  Read more »

Fall Traditions and Celebrations Around the World

All over the world, families and cultures have unique traditions celebrated in the fall. We asked a group of families around the world to share with us their celebrations. Here are the many beautiful and joyous celebrations, big and small, they shared with us from different corners of the world. This post is part of a regular monthly blogging carnival with Multicultural Kid Blogs, hosted by a different and talented multicultural blog each month.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in France: Spanish, French and English

Where are you from?   Maria: California   Samuel: Paris, France   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Maria:  In a suburb of Paris, France. We've also lived in Provo, Utah and other surrounding cities of Provo during and after our Brigham Young University (BYU) studies.  Read more »

Should we switch from OPOL to ML@H to maximize language exposure?

Dear Dr. Gupta,   We are an English/German-speaking family, currently living in Germany practicing one parent one language (OPOL) with our two-year-old. We're moving to an English-speaking country soon and are wondering if we should switch to minority language at home (ML@H) to maximise German exposure? Any thoughts?   ~ Debating ML@H?   Dear Debating ML@H,   I'm not very keen on deliberate decisions to use particular languages.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Canada: Mandarin, Latvian and English

Where are you from?   Inese: I was born in Latvia but moved to Shanghai, China when I was 20.   Eric: I was born in Shanghai China, but moved to Canada when I was 20. That was the same calendar year Inese moved to Shanghai. Weird coincidence.   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Inese & Eric: We currently live in Vancouver, Canada—which is the only place we’ve lived together, so far.  Read more »

22 Adorable Children Laughing Around the World

One of the best sounds in the world is hearing a child’s laughter. Laughter is infectious and makes us feel good. But it also does more than that. A study published in the Journal of Neuroscience found that a “strong sense of humor is an important part of positive emotion and may help children to be more resilient.” Laughter has also been linked to helping children negotiate the complex period of pre-adolescence and adolescence.  Read more »

10 Best Places for an International Family Vacation

To find the best places in the world to travel with kids, we went right to the experts—all those well traveled parents that have seen the world, sometimes many times over, with kids in tow. We were looking for places that had a combination of fun stuff to do, a sense of adventure while being safe, kid friendly attitudes and were also relatively not too challenging to travel around with kids.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.K.: Urdu, Italian and English

Welcome Sara and Waqar!   Where are you from?   Sara: Italy   Waqar: Pakistan   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   We live and have always lived together in London.   How did you meet? (And please give us the good, long story with all the details! Don’t skimp on the details!)   Sara: We met at work.  Read more »

Why is My Bilingual Child’s Vocabulary Below Her Peers?

Dear Dr. Gupta,   Some background information first: We are raising our children German-English bilingually in the U.S. I am a native German and I speak German with the kids, but my husband speaks English and pre-school, school, etc. is all in English. There are not many other German-speaking families in the area we live. Our four- and six-year-old girls both speak German (with some grammar mistakes).  Read more »

Kids Around the World: Summer Water Fun

Nothing says summertime like splashing in the water to cool down in the summer heat. Let's take a peek at kids globally having some summer water fun. Be sure to check out kids' other favorite thing about summer: ice cream around the world! 20 0 2 Courtesy: Muhammad Ghouri 1. Cuba   Courtesy: flickr 2.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Guatemala: Russian, Spanish and English

Welcome Marina and Federico!   Where are you from?   Marina: I was born in the former USSR and immigrated to the U.S. with my parents when I was six. I am a U.S. citizen and have been living in Central America for over 10 years.   Federico: Guatemala.   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Marina: We live in Guatemala and lived in Costa Rica for six years before here.  Read more »

Ramadan: June 28-July 28

Ramadan falls in the ninth month of the Muslim lunar year and is one of the largest holidays for Muslims. It begins when the new moon is spotted; each year it begins approximately 10 to 11 days earlier. It was during Ramadan that Allah (God) first revealed the Quran to Prophet Muhammed. Ramadan is a month of spiritual reflection and self-control through fasting.  Read more »

Tanabata Festival: July 7

Tanabata is the Japanese star festival. The cultural festival dates back approximately 2000 years and has its roots in a Chinese legend. Princess, Orihime, a weaver, fell in love with a cow herder named Hikoboshi. They were so madly in love that they forgot about their work. As punishment, Orihime's father, the emperor of the heavens, moved the lovers to opposite sides of the Milky Way and allowed them to meet only once a year on the seventh day of the seventh month.  Read more »

Awesome Summer Activity: Explorer Journal

I loved this journal from one of my favorite shops: Children Inspire Design. You can buy one through them or craft your own with a fun cover together with your kids. Let it be their summer journal to record whatever their heart desires, both big adventures and small..  Read more »

How Many Languages Are Too Many for a Child?

Dear Dr. Gupta,   I have a burning question. How many languages is too many? I ask because we are a trilingual family English/French/Spanish. We have decided on homeschooling this September with our two girls (two-and-a-half & turning five), in part to be able to up the time spent with Spanish, the minority language in our house, which has been falling by the wayside.  Read more »

Cute Kids and Their Dogs around the World

Not much is cuter than kids and their dogs. The love between children and dogs knows no boundaries as dogs make the most faithful and simplest of friends. From around the world, InCultureParent has selected some of the most adorable pictures showing the unbreakable bond between child and dog. 20 0 2 Courtesy: ibz_omar 1.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Mandarin, Spanish and English

Welcome Carmen and Whitney!   Where are you from?   Whitney: Hanover, New Hampshire U.S.. Carmen: Quito, Ecuador   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   We live in San Francisco and have temporarily lived together in Quito, Ecuador and Paris, France. We have traveled together to many places around the world like: India, Turkey, South East Asia, Central and South America and Europe.  Read more »

Mother’s Around the World

Mother's Day is celebrated on different dates worldwide but for a number of countries, it is usually in May. Moms are always so busy doing stuff for everyone else, they so rarely take enough time to celebrate themselves. So we at InCultureParent put together a tribute for all of you mothers. Here's a look at global motherhood, celebrating all those mamas, mamis, muttis, ammas, mums, ummis, maes, aais, hahas, mommys and more from Japan to Uzbekistan and Paraguay and beyond.  Read more »

Korean Children’s Day: May 5

Children’s Day is a South Korean national holiday celebrating, you guessed right, children. The holiday was created in 1923 by children’s book author Bang Jeong Hwan as a way to honor children since he believed they were the future of the country. Bang Jeong-hwan wrote, "Children are the heroes of tomorrow. May they grow to be gentle, vigorous, and wise.  Read more »

Kids Playing Around the World

Play is one of those magical activities that connects us as human beings. Children have an innate sense of play through which they discover the world and their place in it. The power of play teaches cooperation and connection and allows children to understand cultural norms and expectations as well as themselves and their own emotions. A source of joy and happiness, play is universal to children everywhere.  Read more »

Vaisakhi (Bhaisakhi): April 14

Vaisakhi (also spelled Bhaisakhi) is a joyful festival on April 14, celebrating the founding of the Sikh community known as the Khalsa. While it historically was a celebration in Punjab, India of the first harvest, after 1699, the day came to commemorate the founding of the Sikh community by Guru Gobind Singh.   The celebration begins with Sikhs donning their nice clothes and visiting Gurdwara (Sikh place of worship), where they participate in special prayers, sing songs and share a meal in the langar hall (community hall).  Read more »

Ayyam-i-Ha: February 26-March 1

Ayyam-i-Ha (also called Intercalary Days) is a period of hospitality, charity and gift-giving for Baha'is that is celebrated from February 26 to March 1. This is a festive time where people give gifts--mainly to children, have parties and focus on charity. Baha'u'llah, the founder of the Baha'i faith, said of Ayyam-i-Ha, "It behoveth the people of Baha, throughout these days, to provide good cheer for themselves, their kindred and, beyond them, the poor and needy, and with joy and exultation to hail and glorify their Lord, to sing His praise and magnify His Name.  Read more »

Globe for Kids: Do It Yourself

Check out this map that you can download, color and hang yourself. Now this is cool. Imagine a couple of them hung together in a child's room. Or as a living room shelf decoration. You can download the directions and template from We love this--thanks Joachim!   .  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Vietnam: French, Vietnamese and English

Welcome Elka and Thien!   Where are you from? Elka: I was born in England. My dad is British and my mother is German. When I was very young, we lived in Africa, then moved to Canada.   Thien: I was born in Ben Tre, Vietnam and immigrated to Australia at three years old. I then moved back to Vietnam in 2003.   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together? Elka: We met in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and have never lived anywhere else together.  Read more »

Language Resource Library for Raising Bilingual Kids

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Z        This page is a way for all of us to share resources for books, websites, music, apps, games and more for raising our bilingual children. These are reader recommendations on resources by language. Many of these products we have not looked into ourselves and therefore they are not endorsements.  Read more »

Mandarin Books on Video for Kids

  Here is a HUGE collection of Mandarin books on youtube, including stuff like Don't Let the Pigeon Ride the Bus and Berenstain Bears, A Picture for Harold's Room. Each book is read aloud on Youtube in Mandarin (this is especially great for non-native speaking Mandarin parents who want to help their kids with Mandarin):   原来是你啊 : : http://youtu.  Read more »

St. Nicholas Day: December 6

St. Nicholas Day is a popular celebration for children across many European countries. St. Nicholas is the predecessor to Santa Claus and has a reputation for his generosity. As legend has it, he leaves children presents if they are nice and coal if they are naughty in their shoes. St. Nicholas lived in what was formerly Greece and is now Turkey in the third century A.  Read more »

Glühwein Recipe (hot wine punch)

When the days grow shorter and the temperature decreases so much so that you see yourself breathing outside, then it’s that time of year when you need the right beverage to warm you up from the inside. This winter beverage is glühwein in German, literally glow wine or hot wine punch would be the loose English translation. Glühwein is popular in all the German-speaking countries, the Netherlands and the Alsace region of France as a traditional holiday drink  Read more »

Communication Fail: Failing Books

.  Read more »

Eid al-Adha: October 26

Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) celebrates Ibrahim's (Abraham in Christianity and Judaism) obedience to God in nearly sacrificing his son Ishmael (Ismael), but instead was able to sacrifice a ram in his place. It is celebrated on the 10th day of the month of the lunar Islamic calendar following Hajj, Muslims' annual pilgrimage to Mecca. Since Eid begins at the first sighting of the new moon, the date varies by one day depending on whether the Saudi Arabian or North American sighting is observed.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Spanish and English

Welcome Becky and Antonio!   Where are you from?   Becky: I am from Chicago and Antonio is from Mexico City.   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Antonio: We live in Houston, Texas. We have lived together in the U.S. and in the U.K.   How did you meet?   Becky: When I was a student at the University of Illinois-Champaign, there was a student organization called “International Illini.  Read more »

Enkutatash (Ethiopian New Year): September 11

Enkutatash, the Ethiopian New Year, marks the end of the rainy reason and the beginning of the spring sunshine. While Ethiopia follows the Julian calendar, the holiday falls on September 11th according to the Western or Gregorian calendar, except for leap years, when it occurs on September 12th. Enkutatash, meaning “gift of jewels” in Amharic, originally derives from the story of the Queen of Sheba returning from visiting King Solomon in Jerusalem, according to popular legend.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the Netherlands: Polish, German and Dutch

Welcome Olga and Nikolai!   Where are you from?   Olga: Poland   Nikolai: Germany   Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together?   Olga + Nikolai: Winnipeg, Canada (August 2006-December 2006), Hamburg, Germany (September 2007-October 2008), Delft and Rijswijk, The Netherlands (September 2009 until now).  Read more »

Ramadan: July 20 through August 18

Ramadan falls in the ninth month of the Muslim lunar year and is one of the largest holidays for Muslims. It begins when the new moon is spotted and falls on August 1st this year; each year it begins approximately 10 to 11 days earlier. It was during Ramadan that Allah (God) first revealed the Quran to Prophet Muhammed. Ramadan is a month of spiritual reflection and self-control through fasting.  Read more »

Open Letter to Barnes & Noble

Dear Barnes & Noble,   We love the diverse selection of books you offer and how much fun our children have browsing through books and games every time we come in to your store. We frequently purchase books for presents on our way to a birthday party but we always notice something is missing when we browse the children’s section: more multicultural children’s literature.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in China: Chinese and English

Welcome Lizi and Da Jun! Where are you from? Lizi: U.K. Da Jun: China Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together? Lizi: Beijing, China—we’ve lived here since we met, but we are currently in the throes of moving back to the U.K. How did you meet? Lizi: We met through friends during the SARS epidemic in 2003.  Read more »

Nowruz (Persian New Year): March 20

Nowruz (Nouruz/Nowrooz/Norooz), the Persian New Year, falls on the first day of spring of the solar calendar (which is different from the Gregorian solar calendar). Nowruz is a festivity that transcends religions as it is not confined to any one religious group--it is celebrated in many countries globally including Iran, Central Asia, Turkey and in other traditional Persian communities found throughout the world.  Read more »

Holi: March 8

Holi is the Indian Festival of Colors. It is the celebration of the beginning of spring and represents rejuvenation and rebirth through all of the bright colors associated with the festival. During the festival, people smear powdered, bright colors on each other's faces and splash colored water at one another.   Holi is a Hindu festival, typically celebrated in the North of India, and is also celebrated around the world in places like Nepal, Sri Lanka, and countries which have a large Hindu Diaspora like Suriname, Guyana, South Africa, Trinidad, the U.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: German and English

Welcome Latifa and Kaila! Where are you from? I am American. I was born and raised in Michigan from Italian, Maltese and French Canadian heritage. The Italian and Maltese (father’s side) seems the strongest on the outside, but my mother's gentle spiritual silence runs strong underneath. Kaila was born in Switzerland, and has lived in the U.S. since she was 10 months old.  Read more »

Lunar New Year: January 23, 2012

The Lunar New Year (or Asian New Year) is the most celebrated holiday of the year across many Asian countries. On the first day of the first new moon after the winter solstice in the lunar calendar (January 23, 2012), countries like Korea, Taiwan, China, Vietnam and Asian communities in many Western countries will celebrate the New Year. The New Year flushes out the old and welcomes in the new, making space for happiness, wealth, luck and longevity.  Read more »

Three Kings Day Recipe: Rosca de Reyes

Rosca de Reyes is the traditional pastry bread eaten on Three Kings Day across Latin America and beyond. The best part for kids is a hidden surprise in the bread–a plastic baby (representing the Three Kings’ search for baby Jesus). Whoever finds it in their slice has good luck or some other obligation. For example, in Mexico traditionally, the person who found the baby had to host a party on February 2, known as Día de la Candelaria–this ritual is no longer as common though everywhere in Mexico today  Read more »

Three Kings Day: January 6

While many people are undergoing the Christmas let-down that happens after the 25th, others are just gearing up for their holiday season. Christmas is just one marker on the festive path through the holidays that culminates in Three Kings Day (El Dia de los Reyes Magos also known as Epiphany). Three Kings Day is celebrated in many Christian regions around the world, including Latin America, Spain and much of Eastern Europe, and by Christian populations in places like Turkey, Syria and others.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.K.: Arabic, French, German and English

Welcome Souad and Jan! Where are you from? Souad: I am Algerian. Jan: I am from Germany. I was born in the middle, grew up in the North then moved to the South, but I consider myself a Northerner. Where do you currently live and what countries have you lived in together? Souad: We have been living in England for eight years. Before that, we lived in France together for three years.  Read more »

Hopi Winter Solstice (Soyal): December 22

The Hopi Indians, who have lived in the highlands of northern Arizona for over a thousand years, divide their calendar into 12 months with different ceremonies in each month. December is the month where the katsinas or kachinas, the spirits that guard over the Hopi, come down from their world at the winter solstice or Soyal (also referred to as Soyaluna and Soyalangwu).  Read more »

Winter Solstice Craft: Egg Box Snake

Snakes are an important symbol for the Hopi Indians and make an appearance during the winter solstice ceremony, called Soyal. Although information about many of the Hopi rituals is scarce and hard to verify since so many ritual dances are closed to the public, tribal chiefs are said to make offerings and prayers to an effigy of a black plumed snake during the winter solstice, (although the main Hopi snake celebration is in August).  Read more »

Travel the Globe with the World Atlas

Barefoot Books’ newly released World Atlas for children, written by Nick Crane and illustrated by David Dean, is one of those books that will grow with your child over time. It is stuffed with factoids and information about our planet, with colorful illustrations that will continue to entice children to explore its pages. Did you know that dates have been around for so long that no one knows what region the palm tree is native to; or that polar bears are the largest predator on earth, weighing up to 1,499 pounds?   The Atlas aims to present a snapshot of our planet today and how people in different parts of the world interact with it.  Read more »

Chanukah Ham on Sale

What's wrong with this picture? A classic case of marketing fail at Walmart..  Read more »

Eid Craft: Star and Moon Card

Materials: Construction paper- at least 2 different colors Glitter Scissors Star and moon shapes Glue Pencil or pen Instructions: 1. Use cookie cutters or draw and cut a master copy of a star and moon. Have the kids trace stars and moons onto a piece of construction paper. 2. Let the kids cut the shapes themselves or cut for them. 3. Glue the shapes to a piece of construction paper, folded in half to make a card.  Read more »

Day of the Dead Recipe: Pan de Muerto

By Gabriela from Gabriela’s Kitchen Since November 1st and 2nd are believed to be the easiest days for mis muertos queridos (my departed loved ones) to visit and take pleasure in earthly delights, I will light candles and set out fragrant marigolds to guide their way, bake delicious pan de muerto to satisfy their stomachs and set out a glass of water to quench their thirst  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Korean and English

Welcome Amber and Ben! Where are you from? Amber: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Ben: Suburbs of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Where do you currently live? Philadelphia, Pennsylvania How old are your children and where were they born? Claudia is three and a half. She was born here in Philadelphia. Béla just turned three and he was born in South Korea.  Read more »

Communication Fail: How Not to Sell Suits

From Hoboken, New Jersey -Submitted by Pierre, NJ.  Read more »

German Recipe: Pheasant in a Creamy Wine Reduction Sauce with Sauerkraut

While the international community is traveling to Munich to drink beers from huge glasses and eat grilled chicken or schweinshaxn (roasted pork knuckle) at the world’s most famous beer party, Oktoberfest, we look for something a little lighter but every bit as German. Serves 4

For the pheasant:
1 (1  Read more »

Fall Picture Frame from Fallen Leaves

Take your kids for a walk outside and collect some leaves in the spirit of fall! Materials: Newspaper Paint and paintbrush Paper Leaves Ruler or anything that can be used to draw a straight line Instructions: 1. Collect some freshly fallen leaves, not yet too brittle. 2. Allow the leave to flatten overnight between the pages of a book. 3.  Read more »

Germany’s Oktoberfest: September 17 – October 3

Germany's Oktoberfest, one of the largest fairs in the world, attracts over six million people annually to Munich to drink locally brewed beer, eat German specialties, sing and dance. The beer comes from six local breweries and the most typical foods are roast chicken, pork knuckles, sauerkraut, and sausages together with other foods like potato pancakes and apple strudel.  Read more »

Celebrating the Jewish Sabbath in Ethiopia

A Day of Delight: A Jewish Sabbath in Ethiopia by Maxine Rose Schur and illustrated by Brian Pinkney shows the way of life of an Ethiopian Jewish community.   The book opens with a mother cooking breakfast of injera and coffee for her family inside their village hut. We follow the eldest son, Menelik, as he goes about his workday as a blacksmith with his father, crafting sickles used to cut down teff grass, which they will sell.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Guatemala: Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese and English

Welcome Susan and Shlomo! Where are you from? Susan: I was born in Connecticut but I grew up in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Shlomo: Near Tel Aviv, Israel. Where do you currently live? Guatemala City, Guatemala How did you meet? Susan: We met in New York—we were introduced by a mutual friend. It was a blind date. Shlomo: I was in the Israeli air force and working on a project for the air force in an American company, supervising the purchase of equipment for Israel.  Read more »

9 Things You Should Never Say to Adoptive Parents

With many multicultural families formed by adoption or expanded by adoption (and obviously not solely multicultural families), we thought it’s important to address some etiquette surrounding adoption. Most people probably have friends who have adopted, but there are still many misconceptions about adoption. Sometimes people don’t know what’s ok to ask and what’s not ok.  Read more »

8 Rules of Adoption Etiquette

With many multicultural families formed by adoption or expanded by adoption (and obviously not solely multicultural families), we felt it was important to address some etiquette surrounding adoption. Most people have friends who have adopted, but there are still many misconceptions about adoption. Sometimes people don’t know what’s alright to ask and what’s not.  Read more »

Ramadan Recipe: Moroccan Harira

Harira is a traditional Moroccan soup made during Ramadan to break the daily fast, and is served after eating dates and milk. It is traditionally made with lamb, but the lamb can be omitted to make it vegetarian for a hearty meal as well. I prefer it without lamb.   My first harira was out of a box (yes they really do make a boxed version!) Back in the day, when my husband and I were just boyfriend and girlfriend, he and his brother were making Ramadan dinner with boxed harira  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Mandarin, Spanish and English

Welcome Michelle and Tim!   Where are you from?   Michelle: ZhengZhou, Henan, China   Tim: I was born in Trinidad and Tobago and when I was about six weeks old, we moved to Puerto Rico. I don’t feel Trinidadian. If anything I feel more Puerto Rican or just plain old America.   Where do you currently live and how long ago did you come to the U.  Read more »

Mongolia’s Naadam Festival: July 11-13

The Naadam Festival is the major Mongolian holiday. Naadam, meaning game or competition in Mongolian, features the three sporting passions of Mongolians: wrestling, horse racing and archery over three days of festivities. Naadam is not just limited to sports but is a carnival of music, dancing and food.   All three sports have their roots in the historical warrior tradition of Mongolia.  Read more »

Mongolian Matching Game

Mongolian children have traditionally played many different games using animal bones. One common game is the first player gathers all the bones (usually ankle bones of goat, sheep and horses) and throws them on a flat surface. The player then looks for pairs of matching bones and flicks one of the matching bones to hit the other matching bone. If they touch any other bone, then they lose their turn.  Read more »

Peruvian Recipe: Lomo Saltado

A lot of typical Andean foods are comfort foods for me. I know comfort foods are usually something that reminds you of your childhood, but comfort foods for me are related to places and times when I felt everything about life was good, much like the time I spent living in Ecuador. This is a Peruvian recipe for lomo saltado (Ecuadorians make it too) from Fighting Windmills that is simple and so tasty  Read more »

Mongolian recipe: Khuushuur

This simple Mongolian recipe is popular at Naadam. Khuushuur uses straightforward

Ingredients that can be found tucked away in your kitchen cabinet. Served best warm, they are also a great alternative to the potsticker or empanada (yum).


Main I

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Midsummer Craft: Sun Catchers

What better way to celebrate Midsummer than making a sun-inspired craft. These sun catchers will look awesome on your windows and your kids will love watching the sun filter through them.     Materials: Black poster board or construction paper Wax paper Scissors Crayons Grater Glue     Instructions: 1. Trace a sun on a piece of paper, around a plate, onto black paper.  Read more »

St. Jean Baptiste Day (Canada): June 24

Akin to the national holiday of Quebec, Saint Jean Baptiste Day is a celebration of Francophone culture in Canada. While Jean Baptiste is Quebec’s patron saint, Jean Baptiste Day has more pagan than religious roots and remains a secular holiday today.   The day was originally a celebration of the summer solstice. However, in 1834, after becoming inspired by the celebration of St.  Read more »

Make a Snowy Owl

A popular symbol of Quebec is the snowy owl (the national bird). To celebrate St. Jean Baptiste day, let’s make something fun and representative of Quebec.   Materials: 1 regular-size paper plate 1 dessert-size paper plate Cotton balls or white feathers (or even both) Scraps of yellow and brown construction paper Black pen Glue Scissors   Instructions: 1.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in France: German, French and English

Welcome Metrice and Don!   Where are you from?   Metrice: I am American. I grew up in Silver Springs, Maryland (a suburb of Washington D.C.). Don: I was born in Germany. My mom is French and my Dad is American. My parents met in Germany. I was raised until I was 16 in Darmstadt, Germany and at 16 moved to the U.S.   Where do you currently live?   Montpellier, France   Which countries have you lived in since you’ve been together?   U.  Read more »

Our Next Giveaway: Bee-Bim Bop

Because we love our readers, we love to give stuff away to you! Win Bee-Bim Bop by Linda Sue Park, courtesy of Clarion Books, which is a wonderful book about this yummy Korean dish. To win, follow these steps: 1. Like us on Facebook. 2. Tell us what your favorite Korean dish is in the comments below. Don't have one? Then tell us why you would like to win instead.  Read more »

Vesak Craft: Make a Paper Lantern

A popular craft for kids on Vesak is making a lantern. This is a craft for a simple one below but you can go more elaborate with different colored paper, ribbons and streamers if you desire! Materials: Popsicle sticks (or an easy alternative requiring no glue is bendy straws that fit together) Glue (a hot glue gun works best) Piece of cardboard String Tissue paper, any color (or another type of thin paper) Instructions: This craft is traditionally done using bamboo.  Read more »

Vesak (Wesak): May 13 (date varies)

Vesak (also known as Wesak) commemorates the Buddha’s birth, enlightenment and death with a colorful, fun festival. Casually the holiday is often referred to as the “Buddha’s birthday.” The exact date of Vesak changes according to the varying lunar calendars used in different traditions. It is primarily celebrated within Theravada Buddhism (practiced in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Singapore, Malaysia, Laos, etc.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Ghana: Twi, Ga and English

Welcome Kaela and Fred! Where are you from? Kaela: Philadelphia, U.S. Fred: Larteh, Ghana Where do you currently live? Accra, Ghana How did you meet? Kaela: We met in a Philosophy of Culture course at the University of Ghana. I was there through an exchange program and he was in his last year. I did a semester at the University here during my last year of university.  Read more »

Our Next Giveaway: A Lion’s Mane

Because we love our readers, we have more fun stuff to offer you!   Win A Lion's Mane by Navjot Kaur, courtesy of Saffron Press, which is a wonderful book about the Sikh turban.   To win, follow these steps: 1. Like us on Facebook. 2. Tell us why you would like to win in the comments section below. 3. You can be entered to win twice if you tweet about this giveaway or let your Facebook friends know about it (let us know you did this in the comments).  Read more »

Cultural Faux Pas in Morocco (or possibly most of the Arab world): Breastfeeding (read on)

My husband, despite having been born and raised in Morocco for 19 years, is not the most knowledgeable about cultural norms in his country. This is largely because he just doesn't care about them, which is fine if you are from that country. However when it comes to me, his foreign spouse, I want to do the right thing as I think it is important to respect traditions and norms when in other countries.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Arabic, Spanish and English

Welcome Selene and Jad!   Where are you from?   Selene: Guadalajara, Mexico   Jad: Rachaya El Wadi, Lebanon   Where do you currently live?   Grand Rapids, Michigan   Selene: We have only ever lived in Michigan together.   How did you meet?   Selene: We met in school (university) in Michigan when he was a junior and I was a sophomore and ended up working at the same office—a study abroad office—in college.  Read more »

Easter: April 8

Easter is a Christian holiday, celebrating Jesus Christ's resurrection from the dead. It falls two days after Good Friday, which commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus. Easter also marks the end of Lent, the 40-day season characterized by fasting, prayer and penance. In the Western church, Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday following the first full moon after the vernal equinox.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Norway: English, Farsi and Norwegian

Welcome Tine and Kambiz!   Where are you from?   Tine: Åndalsnes, Norway Kambiz: Tehran, Iran   Where do you currently live?   Oslo, Norway   Which countries have you lived in since you've been together?   Egypt, Tajikistan and Norway   Tine: We first lived in Tajikistan together.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Portuguese, Romanian and English

Welcome Ingrid and Leo!   Where are you from? Leo: Brazil   Ingrid: Romania   Where do you currently live? Berkeley, CA. (The each hold a PhD from the University of Berkeley).   How did you meet? Leo: At a birthday party of a friend in common.   Ingrid: It's a much longer story than that. He was visiting from Brazil.  Read more »

Ayyam-i-Ha Craft: Advent Style Banner

Ayyam-i-Ha is the time of the year for gift giving, celebrating and performing acts of charity. Here's an advent type banner with 4 pockets--1 for each day of Ayyam-i-Ha that one crafty mama created for Ayyam-i-Ha. Each morning her kids wake up to a surprise. This post has been reprinted with permission from Carrie over at Tao Of Craft.   Materials: Felt in coordinating pieces Rainbow strip of fabric (or make your own from different color felt strips) Fabric glue Pinking sheers (if you want a pinked edge) Baha'i star template ~ You can download it HERE   Instructions: 1.  Read more »

Ayyam-i-Ha Recipe: Fesenjan (walnut-pomegranate chicken)

Because the Baha’i faith was born out of what was formerly Persia, Persian recipes are very appropriate for Ayyam-i-Ha. This recipe for fesenjan, also called fesanjoon depending on the regional dialect, combines chicken with pomegranates and walnuts for an amazing explosion of taste.  



1/4 cup olive oil
2 to 3 pounds of chicken, cut into pieces
2 diced onions
2 cups of walnuts, finely ground (in a food processor)
2-3 cups of water (you can alternatively use chicken stock for extra flavor)

 Read more »

Chinese New Year: February 3

The Chinese New Year is the most celebrated holiday of the year in China. It takes place on the first day of the first new moon after the winter solstice in the lunar calendar (February 3rd, 2011). Socially, it is a time for being with friends and relatives and the greater significance is of flushing out the old and welcoming in the new. This holiday, more than any other Chinese holiday, stresses the importance of family ties.  Read more »

InCultureParent’s Essential Chinese New Year Reading List

Cat and Rat: The Legend of the Chinese Zodiac By Ed Young (author and illustrator) Review by Frances Kai-Hwa Wang Beautifully written retelling of the story about how the 12 animals of the zodiac were chosen and why the cat and the rat are no longer friends. It really portrays the personalities of the cat, rat, ox, and other animals and ties their personality to how they run their race.  Read more »

5 Crafts for the Chinese New Year

There were so many adorable and fun crafts for the Chinese New Year, it was impossible to pick only one to showcase this month. So InCultureParent has put together an overview of some of the best crafts we found for the Chinese New Year. They range from very easy (fingerprint cherry blossoms) to medium-difficulty (dragon mask) and many can be made with materials from around the house (e.  Read more »

Cultural Faux Pas From Morocco

The second or maybe third time I had gone to visit my in-laws in Morocco, I definitely felt like I had it down. I had learned many of the cultural rules like to be careful that I don't thoughtlessly put my hand on my husband's leg or my arm around him in casual conversation. I also knew enough to run the cold water when you dump boiling water down the drain because of the superstition that the devil or spirits can live in the drain.  Read more »

Language Fail from Japan

Submitted by Simone, Bangkok.  Read more »

Language Fender Bender from Mexico

Do you have your own communication fail in words or in pictures? Please share it with us at with "Communication Fail" in the title..  Read more »

Japanese New Year: January 1st through January 3rd

The Japanese New Year, shogatsu, spans several days from December 31st to January 3rd. It is the most important holiday of the year in Japan. While the New Year was originally based on the Chinese lunar calendar, in 1873, it changed to the Gregorian calendar. To prepare for the New Year, people clean their houses and decorate. Kadomatsu are a common decoration made from bamboo, pine branches and strips of folded white paper.  Read more »

Armenian Christmas: January 6

Armenian Christmas, also known as Theophany, is celebrated one day before the Orthodox Christmas. Although Armenia follows the Gregorian calendar, when the Romans changed the date of Christmas to December 25 in the fourth century, Armenians held to the original January 6th date. Santa Claus/Father Christmas is known as Gaghant Baba to Armenians. He traditionally comes on New Year's Eve (December 31st), which is the start of the holiday season leading up to Christmas.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in the U.S.: Russian, Spanish, Dutch and English

Welcome Trevor and Rocio! Where are you from? Trevor: Breda, Netherlands Rocio: Mexico City, Mexico Where do you currently live? Queens, New York (Richmond Hill) Which countries have you lived in since you've been together? Just one—the U.S. How did you meet? Trevor: We met at a Valentine's Day party in NYC where I met you (the editor—Stephanie).  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Thailand: Portuguese, Cantonese, Thai and Japanese

Welcome Simone and Ewan! Where are you from? Simone: I was born in Brazil and my parents are Japanese. Ewan: I was born in Los Angeles, CA to Chinese parents and we moved to Hong Kong when I was three. We came back to the U.S. when I was a freshman in high school. I went to high school and college in the U.S. then went to Japan after college.  Read more »

Hanukkah: December 1

Hanukkah, meaning "dedication" in Hebrew, celebrates the re-dedication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem after the Jews defeated the Seleucids (Syrian-Greeks). It is an eight day and night tradition where one additional candle is lit each night on the menorah. The history of Hanukkah dates back to 18 B.C.E. when the Seleucids took the Jewish Holy Temple from the Jewish people and dedicated it to the worship of the God Zeus.  Read more »

Real Intercultural Family in Montenegro: German and Serbian

Welcome Thomas and Zagorka! Where are you from? Thomas: Germany Zaga: Montenegro Where do you currently live? Thomas: Montenegro but we also have an apartment in Germany How many different houses have you lived in since you've been together? Thomas: three (two in Montenegro and one in Germany) How did you meet? Thomas: Work. We (my company) were carrying out a workshop at a bank in Montenegro and Zaga was one of the participants.  Read more »

Diwali: November 5th

Diwali, the Festival of Lights, is one of the most vibrant and exciting Hindu celebrations. It is full of color and reverie, representing the philosophy behind it. The festival celebrates the triumph of good over evil and awareness of one's own inner light against a backdrop of fireworks, sweets, new clothes, decorating and cleaning homes, lighting lanterns and diyas (small oil lamps made of clay), exchanging gifts and drawing henna designs on hands.  Read more »
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[…] the breastfeeding culture in Mongolia compared to America. Did you have any idea that something as simple as breastfeeding attitudes can […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
My mother born in the 1930's is originally from the northern part of Germany. I am in my mid fifties and have a terrible relationship with my mother. She is domineering and hurts those where it hurt...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
[…] JC Niala, InCultureParent […...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
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From Breastfeeding Around the World
Although humanity is one Man (in a generic sense, including woman)has identified himself endless groups, religious, nationalistic, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, etc. Once you separate ME from YOU on...
From What’s an Asian? Race and Identity for a New Generation
[…] […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
Some great tips here but not many working mothers could feed baby every hour especially if you work in a major multi-nationa...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
So true!!! Thanks for being so honest and self reflective. It's a proof of true characte...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
As a first-time mom I've spent the last two months of my four-month-old's life stressed out about her sleep and I recognize how crazy this is. It's clearly not working for me! I'm wondering how non-...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
[…]        […...
From Why African Toddlers Don’t Have Tantrums
[…] Any content provided on this blog is opinion based with selected information from various sources where indicated. Image:
From Imbolc Craft: St. Brigid’s Cross
Or you could have had a beautiful white baby with a man from your own culture. Not enough drama in tha...
From How I Reclaimed My House from My Mother-in-Law
Crystal, thanks for sharing your experiences. It makes for a fascinating read! The link to the Siddha school you provided seems to be no longer working. Is the school still ther...
From How I Moved to Thailand with my Family on Less than $1000
[…] but which colour to choose? Biome has 25% off storewide till midnight tonight with the code BIOME25 why African babies don’t cry – an absolutely brilliant […...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
[…] […...
From 6 Children’s Books to Celebrate Juneteenth
I love this website and its insight on raising global citizens. I agree with what you say about no one English accent being correct - the thing that I was surprised by in this article was the fact ...
From Should I Worry about My Child’s Accent in Her Foreign Language?
Why are Germans thinking about being rude? Do You All want to be Just A Coarse-Face? If all of you deviate from Universalism, there is much more to fear from the world than you expec...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
[…] 3 Children’s Books from the Himalayas at InCultureParent […...
From 3 Beautiful Children’s Books That Take Place in the Himalayas
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From How I Talk to My Kindergarten Classroom About Race
[…] don’t Need a Room. The baby room is certainly a modern invention. For much of history, and in other parts of the world today, babies […...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Addressing the "grown up time" someone mentioned sure that many people address this differently with what works for their family. However, suffice it to say that when the baby's in your...
From The African Guide to Co-sleeping
[…] were taught to whistle – but other people use other sounds. Most people seem to shush or to hiss. It doesn’t really matter. You could probably sing “La Cucaracha” and it would stil...
From Thanks to Chinese Potty-Training We’re Done With Diapers at 19 Months
Thanks for the article! I tried to put my newborn twins into a bassinet at birth, but there was just no way! No way to breastfeed and no way to survive the nights with two of them waking me up all...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Olga, witam!:) what a fresh approach this has given me on such a day like today! I'm Half polish being polish from my mothers side and as this is the language that I ident myself with, I decided to ...
From 10 Things Not to Say to Parents of Multilingual Children
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Thank you SOO much for sharing!!!! I have breastfed my twins for 3 years now and still going. It has been a struggle, especially with family members like my mother in law who wished I weaned at 2 m...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
[…] The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep […...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
I aghree with the above comments. Society is reaching a new stages when we all enjoy hearing stories of the beliefs of other...
From Growing Up Baha’i in Rural Maine: A Not-so-Secret Double Life
Hi Kim! I am so glad that this article was useful for you and made you feel validated as a parent. It's not often in this judgmental world of parenting we get that, right?! That's the main reason...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
I love reading your work. I can olny imagine what it would be like to have such beautiful customs and true community. I understand why it is so very very important to keep these traditions alive. Be...
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Your mother in-law seems somewhat reasonable. Many Chinese Mother In-laws are not. In their scenario, they would be number 1 to the child and you would be number two. Many want to have a bond closer...
From How My Chinese Mother-in-Law Replaced my Husband
I think Konstantina is actually responding to what is probably more familiar/praised/or preferred socially as well. I was an English teacher in Poland with a distinct accent. I struggled to get Engl...
From Should I Worry about My Child’s Accent in Her Foreign Language?
Noor Kids' title "First Time Fasting" is another great rea...
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From Why I Travel 13 Hours Alone with My Kids Every Chance I Get
Please help: I Love my wife and my son. I am also EXTREMELY involved as a dad. I had to move to china ( in a tiny tiny town) where I am the only foreigner so that my wife can take over the family bu...
From How My Chinese Mother-in-Law Replaced my Husband
Thanks for writing this!! My baby is 7 months, and I love having her sleep in my room. I don't mention it too often to people who have had kids because they seem a little judgy on it. So tonight I...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Honestly, it looks like the author married into a very backward and old fashioned family. Not stimulating children's curiosity, differences between boys and girls, and women slaving in the house, wh...
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From Breasts are for Babies? Perceptions of Breastfeeding in Italy
[…] that “beatings” are not actually spankings. There may be some truth to this because African tribal culture does not support “spanking”. This is confirmed by my own observation in S...
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[…] Pomlazka, a special handmade whipping stick, is an Easter tradition in the Czech Republic. Made out of pussywillow tigs, pomlazka is braided and then used by the village boys/men to “...
From What’s Easter without a Whipping?