Posts Tagged stephanie-meade

Sunday, December 14th, 2014

10 Best Children’s Books for Gifts


10 Best Children’s Books for Gifts
Looking for that perfect children's book to give to the special child in your life? Then look no further. Below are our top picks for multicultural children's books by age. If you are going to buy any books at all this holiday season, make it a multicultural one as these books are perfect for kids of all cultural backgrounds and are also the ones that are not well represented at bookstores. These are stories that Meera (our Book Editor) and I's kids love, so there’s a good chance your child, grandchild, niece, nephew or friend will love these too.  Read more »

Huge Giveaway for Eid: Tea Collection, Little Passports, Little Pim, Dolls, Books, Music & More

This contest has now closed.   We love our community of readers and wanted to give something to you as a thanks for being part of our InCultureParent community.  Read more »

5 Smoothies Your Kids Will Love

  Since it’s Ramadan, my family and I have been enjoying a fresh smoothie every night to break the daily fast  Read more »

Kid’s Summer Art Journals

  Materials Paper Marker   Instructions   1.  Read more »

Homemade Art Books for Ramadan

In the past I have struggled to keep pace with my newly created Ramadan traditions. For the last three years, my girls and I have done a Ramadan countdown calendar. But the calendar often fell victim to forgetful Mama syndrome...suddenly it was time for lights out but "Waaaait, the calendar!" my girls would wail. Or other times three days had passed and we had forgotten about it.  Read more »

A Children’s Book for Global Citizens: Everyone Prays

Every time a new children’s book arrives in the mail, particularly when it’s a multicultural children’s book, I get really excited to browse the pages. I usually can’t wait for the kids to get home on my first read, as I am so eager to absorb the words and illustrations. But no matter how much I like a book, it usually takes me months and months to review it because of the serious backlog of awesome books Meera and I have to review.  Read more »

Easy Weeknight Moroccan Chicken

Moroccan meals are not something that would typically be on our busy weeknight meal rotation. Weeknight meals most often consist of simple things like quesadillas, spaghetti with pesto, Trader Joe’s heat up food as much as I hate to admit that, and other 20-minute meals. Moroccan meals, like tagines, are often slow cooked to perfection so all the juices from the food and spices mix  Read more »

A Muslim Children’s Book for Preschool-Age Kids

It’s hard to imagine how a children’s picture book about colors could be the center of controversy. But Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors by Hena Khan (author) and Mehrdokht Amini (illustrator) uncomfortably found itself at the fury of a Marietta, Georgia parent when his daughter purchased the book at a school fair. Furious, the father filed a complaint with the school board about the book’s presence at the school fair, remarking, “That culture there doesn’t seem to have anything good coming out of it.  Read more »

21 Ideas for Families to Celebrate Ayyam-i-Ha

Ayyam-i-Ha is a period of hospitality, charity and gift-giving for Baha’is that is celebrated from February 26 to March 1. This is a festive time in preparation for the 20-day fast that follows. There are no set rituals to celebrate Ayyam-i-Ha, allowing people a lot of creativity in their celebrations. We put together a summary of many of the inspiring ideas we found around the web for celebrating this beautiful holiday.  Read more »

Why I am Not Making Valentines This Year

When I was kid, my mom would take me to the drugstore to pick out my Valentine's cards each year. Turning each box over in my small hands, I'd consider the different character choices with an excitement and thoughtfulness that rallied costume-picking at Halloween. Once home, I'd draw a line through "From", replacing it with "Love", and add my name and the kid's name (this always felt laborious by the time I got to 20)  Read more »

18 Ways to Celebrate the Lunar New Year with Crafts, Food and Children’s Books

The Lunar New Year (also known as the Chinese New Year, Tet in Vietnam and Seollal in Korea) is the most celebrated holiday of the year across many Asian countries. The New Year flushes out the old and welcomes in the new, making space for happiness, wealth, luck and longevity. It’s a time to spend with friends and relatives and stresses the importance of family ties.  Read more »

6 Days in Nicaragua with Kids

We recently came back from six days in Nicaragua with five- and seven-year-old kids. Here’s what our family discovered and enjoyed across the country.   Granada       Granada is a great city to spend a couple days. It’s both a launching pad for day trips and a quant colonial city that is almost 500 years old.  Read more »

5 Fun Halloween Costumes with a Global Twist

1. Globe   Globe Halloween Costume/Geography Lesson   2. Eiffel Tower   Photo courtesy :   3. Gangnam Style   Photo courtesy :   4. Dalai Lama   Photo courtesy : pinterest   5. Frida Kahlo   Photo courtesy : Marion Vendituoli .  Read more »

7 Diverse Children’s Cartoons (where the main character isn’t the standard white one)

Stereotypes run rampant in much of our media consumption and children’s cartoons are no exception. Our children, no matter what their race or background, don’t see enough cartoons with diverse characters in different cultural settings. Where cartoons feature some diversity, more often than not the main character remains white but may have a black or brown friend.  Read more »

How I Learned to Be a Happier Mom

I didn't grow up in a very happy household. My parents saw the world as a menacing place, full of people out to screw you. "Life is a battle, you've gotta give it hell every day" was my mom's rough equivalent of "God bless you" when leaving the house in the morning. Like many Americans, my parents placed a high value on material possessions. Making money and acquiring lots of stuff was the mark of having made it and by default "happiness.  Read more »

6 Out-of-the-Box Ideas to Raise a Bilingual Child on a Budget

Raising a bilingual child in a country where bilingualism isn't a given can be expensive. When you don't speak a second language, can't afford private immersion school and tutors are too pricey as are the fancy language classes in your community, then what options do you have left? Here are six out-of-the-box ideas for helping you raise a bilingual child on a budget.  Read more »

6 Favorite Children’s Books about Ramadan

We have read many books about Ramadan in our home, but these are our top six favorites.     1. A Party in Ramadan by Asma Mobin-Uddin is the perfect Ramadan book for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Centered around a Muslim child invited to a non-Muslim child’s pony party during Ramadan, the book adeptly bridges both worlds through a mix of Muslim and non-Muslim characters, while explaining some of the excitement and rituals around Ramadan.  Read more »

Why You Should Travel and See the World

I love this quote! It has been replaying in my mind all day and makes me think about what I should change about my days. Do I live my days as I want to spend my life or am I always thinking along the lines of "I just need to do X for Y amount of time to be able to eventually do Z." Food for thought..  Read more »

Our Trip to Mexico: Drugs, Cartels and Violence?

I am standing in the middle of the dance floor at a glamorous wedding at a hacienda outside of Puebla, Mexico.     It’s one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited with old architecture, lush grass, beautiful flowers and secret hideaways.            There is a large band on stage with entertainers; everyone is dancing, laughing and celebrating.  Read more »

Is My Daughter Singing in Korean?

My six-year-old was teaching this song the other night to her sister. I had to pay attention to see if this was a new Arabic song she might have learned from her babysitter but realized after a sec it wasn't Arabic or any other language we know. What was she singing? "Korean," she answered me flatly (in that, sigh mom, isn't this obvious way). "Chu-Hee and Jeehyun taught it to me.  Read more »

How Immersion Travel Helped My Kids Progress in Spanish

During our trip to Mexico, my children took to Spanish like a fish to water. They have been learning Spanish since September in afterschool time, initially for 20 hours per week and since November for five hours per week.   Our first stop in our 10-day trip was to Puebla for one of my best friend's wedding. My kids had so much fun playing with all the other kids, mostly nieces and cousins of my best friend’s family.  Read more »

7 Tips for Parents with Inflexible Travelers

I have a German friend who brought up his son from ages 10 to 18 in Costa Rica while he worked for German development cooperation. He's more than just a world traveler but a true adventurer—he has spent the last five plus years living in some remote provinces of Afghanistan, nearly getting blown up on one occasion. Despite raising his son during his formative years in Latin America, the son did not come visit his father while we were both living and working in Armenia.  Read more »

Why Arabic is Dead and Spanish is Alive for My Kids

My kids hear Arabic every day from their dad but it’s amazing how much more of a hold Spanish is taking after seven months of learning it. They take Spanish several days per week in a small class with two friends. Plus many of their close friends are native Spanish speakers so we are socially in an environment with Spanish around us pretty frequently.  Read more »

5 Games to Get Your Bilingual Child Talking

Encouraging your children to speak the minority language isn’t always easy. You may encounter resistance or face kids who understand the minority language but prefer to speak in the majority language. To boost their use of the minority language, make it fun! Here are five games that will help get your bilingual children talking. They’ll be having so much fun they won’t even realize they are using the minority language!   Telephone I had a major bilingual “a-ha” moment this past week when playing the game of telephone with my kids.  Read more »

Malalai Joya: A Perfect Role Model for My Daughters

    My daughter's school has asked us to help contribute to an exhibit they are going to hold in the library on great female figures, either historical or someone in your family. I picked Malalai Joya to present because she's one of the most badass women alive. With unflinching bravery, Joya has stood up for women's rights in Afghanistan and spoken about the state of affairs of her country, overrun by warlords and corruption.  Read more »

February is African American History Month

The first historical figure in American history that my daughters learned about is Dr. Martin Luther King. My six-year-old recognizes him in every bookstore we go into it lately, as books on him are everywhere during African American History Month. She has enjoyed coloring in his picture and putting it up on our fridge.       But the thing my kids like the most is singing this song that my kindergartener learned at school and taught to her sister.  Read more »

How I Saved Valentine’s Day in 30 Minutes

I was sure not to fail on helping my kids make (or let’s be real—making for my kids while they kind of help) cute Valentine’s this year. But alas I did. With so many cute and easy ideas out there, like this from Rookie Moms, and this from Parent Hacks, not to mention all of these adorable and doable ideas from The Crafty Crow, I felt motivated--I was all over it this year.  Read more »

Cesar Chavez for Kindergartners

This was daughter's homework book one day this week: Granted, both girls found the book a tad dull, as it is not always as fun reading historical accounts at that age as it is to read books where animals talk and unicorns make appearances, but I was glad they made an age appropriate book on such an important figure in U.S. history. The first two historical figures my older daughter has learned about in kindergarten so far are Dr.  Read more »

A Recipe for Lunar New Year (From My Kindergartner)

I woke up Sunday morning to quite a bit of banging in the kitchen. I was a tad concerned about someone getting hurt or something catching fire, as we don’t normally leave the kids in the kitchen unsupervised. They knew better than to use the stove though, right? But my kindergartner does tend to possess a degree of independence and ignore-the-rules confidence, especially when she feels she is doing right.  Read more »

Why Do You Speak Arabic, Baba?

Lately, my kids have had a lot of questions about language—why they have to take Spanish, why do we speak other languages. My four-year-old has also hit the typically four-year-old stage of really resisting my changing languages with her from English to Spanish. It makes her really angry and she will command me to “Speak English!” If a book happens to have a Spanish word in it, she will cover the page with her hand and tell me not to talk like that.  Read more »

Learning to Use Chopsticks at a Burmese Restaurant

In our family these days, we have developed a new obsession with Burmese food. My six year old and I had a lunch date on Friday after school at our new favorite Burmese place, Burma Superstar. I have no idea how authentic the food is, but we loved eating lotus root chips, noodles in coconut sauce with chicken and green tea salad. Even better, it was all gluten free! Eating gluten free, which she has had to since she was three, is pretty easy when you take advantage of the world's cuisines and discover how many alternatives exist.  Read more »

Favorite Multicultural Children’s Books of 2012 – Old and New

Another year passes by. Weekly trips to the library, gifts and several visits to our local used bookstores...books flowed in from everywhere. Huddling up for a read-aloud still seems to be the most favorite thing to do in our family. I sometimes think I should keep track of every book we read together. But that would almost be impossible.  I usually end up reviewing the ones that make an immediate impact or the ones we keep going back to.  Read more »

Preserved Moroccan Lemon: Make-Your-Own

As a half-Moroccan household, you would think I would have embraced cooking with preserved lemon much sooner than I did. Truth be told, I was a bit intimidated by preserved lemon. I didn’t know how to make it and thought a fresh lemon slice would suffice just fine as a substitute. I was very, very wrong.   The first time I encountered preserved lemon (l’hamed marakad in Moroccan Arabic) was on my second trip to Morocco  Read more »

Multiculturalism at Work in a Kindergarten Classroom

Last week I volunteered for a few hours in my daughter's kindergarten class in Berkeley, California. I loved this glimpse of multiculturalism at work in her class that I witnessed.   Scene: I am sitting at a table with Chu-hee, Amir, Zaire and Rihanna. They are practicing writing “I like to” and gluing a picture of what they like.   Zaire asks me as he glues, “Who lives in your house?”   Me: Me, Jasmin, Lila and their Baba.  Read more »

My Kids Can Speak Spanish in Six Weeks

Okay, maybe I'm exaggerating a bit, but they can sing! My kids started learning Spanish at the end of August for four hours per day after school for my kindergartner and two hours per day for my preschooler. It's amazing to see their progress in just six weeks. They can speak basic phrases and respond to simple questions and commands like "take off your shoes" and "wash your hands.  Read more »

Spanish at the Price of Arabic?

One month ago, we embarked on our official trilingual family journey, introducing over four hours of Spanish daily (via an afterschool program I created) to my oldest, and two hours per day to my youngest (due to different kindergarten and preschool schedules). My goal is for them to be fluent speakers of both Arabic and Spanish. Arabic is the language my husband has spoken to our children since birth, as we have diligently followed the OPOL method.  Read more »

Kids Marshmallow Experiment

A seminal study conducted in the 60s and 70s found that young kids who could delay gratification turned out more successful in school, received higher test scores on their SATs and were better able to cope with stress and frustration when they became teenagers. Apparently, delayed gratification is an intrinsic quality. Whether you can delay gratification or not can be clearly seen in children.  Read more »

Tipping the Bilingual Scale on Arabic Exposure

A few weeks ago, my husband I spent an inordinate amount of hours at work. It was one of those truly hellish weeks for working parents, where we both had important and long work commitments at exactly the same time, which made for a childcare scramble. Luckily, our babysitter was very accommodating (including arriving at the ungodly hour of 6:30 a.m.  Read more »

Eid Mubarak

Eid Mubarak! All dressed in their new dresses for Eid and ready to spend the day at a party. (And that's the only face my three-year-old makes in pictures these days.)   .  Read more »

What Real Men Do

They play beauty salon and wear barrettes. (A pic of my husband and daughter from this weekend that makes me smile.).  Read more »

The Secrets of Writing a Multicultural Children’s Book

So you want to write a multicultural children’s book. You know you have a great story to tell but how do you know if it really works for kids? What makes for a great story? Is there a market for it? What do publishers look for? To answer all these questions and a bunch more, we interviewed Tessa Strickland, Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of one of the leading publishers of multicultural books, Barefoot Books.  Read more »

Ramadan Craft: Star and Moon Banner

This year is the first I have gotten serious about Ramadan decorations. Now that my girls are three and five, they have a much greater understanding of holidays. My five-year-old gets excited by crafts and decorating and was eagerly looking forward to our Ramadan preparations.   My plan this year is to fill every window with stars and moons and decorate our doorways too.  Read more »

Do you want to see more multicultural books at Barnes & Noble?

Meera and I got talking after she wrote her fantastic article 10 Reasons Parents Should Read Multicultural Books to Kids. We felt we had a responsibility to let Barnes & Noble know how we felt about their children’s book selection, particularly that multicultural titles are so poorly represented. So we put together this letter and sent it to them.  Read more »

Open Letter to Barnes & Noble

Dear Barnes & Noble,   We love the diverse selection of books you offer and how much fun our children have browsing through books and games every time we come in to your store. We frequently purchase books for presents on our way to a birthday party but we always notice something is missing when we browse the children’s section: more multicultural children’s literature.  Read more »

My Children’s Identity (according to themselves)

Over the weekend, I announced I was going to cook Moroccan couscous for the first time. Usually, this dish is my husband’s domain. My kids seemed horrified. “But you’re not Moroccan,” My five-year-old informed me. “Only Baba can make that because he’s Moroccan.” “What are you Yasmine?” My husband asked. “I’m Moroccan.” And after a moment she added, “And German.  Read more »

How Bilingualism Can Fail in Multilingual Families

Raising bilingual kids, if nothing else, involves commitment. Bilingualism isn’t automatic. Long before having children or meeting my multilingual husband, I knew I wanted to raise bilingual kids. I was not brought up bilingual and learned the majority of my languages as an adult. As a result, I wanted my kids to have the gift of bilingualism from childhood.  Read more »

Multicultural Children’s Chocolates

A friend of mine picked up a box of chocolates (usually on my no-no list) for my kids on her last trip to Korea. Since she's an "Auntie" to my kids, she claims she gets to spoil them with things I don't generally allow. She's also the one that promises them secret treats behind my back and Lord knows what else. She's the same one I fear which stories she will want to tell my kids about me when they get older, since we've known each other since we were 14.  Read more »

How iPad Language Apps are Making me Lose my Religion

I tend to be a bit anti-technology when it comes to my kids, who are three and five. I grapple with what the right amount of technology is, and whether I think technology in the classroom is a good thing. I tend to favor a Waldorf approach (although my children don’t go to a Waldorf school) of no technology in the classroom and at home. However, the iPad and its language learning apps may be changing my mind.  Read more »

How My Kids Made Me Like Valentine’s Day

I never cared much about Valentine's Day until my oldest daughter was two. That year at preschool, she received her first Valentine's Day cards. The box that they crafted to hold the Valentine's and all of the cards within it became one of her favorite things to play with for many months. Each day, she took out the box and sorted through all the Valentine's, sometimes ordering them and sometimes forgetting them in different places around the house.  Read more »

Progress Report: Mission Arabic-Speaking Babysitter

This past week, we have had our new Arabic-speaking babysitter everyday for a total of 12 hours all week. From day one, she told me the girls understand her 100%, which we know already, it is just their speaking Arabic that has been problematic. In case you missed it, I talked all about that in "All I Want For Christmas is Perfectly Bilingual Children.  Read more »

Traveling with Kids Doesn’t Have to be a Burden

It’s been over a year since we took any trips on an airplane. I forgot how much I enjoy the hustle and bustle of airports, even with kids, as I love their excitement over the little things: Planes! Escalators! The scale at check in! I often hear about parents who gave up their jet-setting lifestyle when kids came along because travel was too much work.  Read more »

Our Dia de los Muertos and Halloween Fun

This weekend we had a taste of all sorts of fall festivities and also celebrated Day of the Dead for the first time at a joint pumpkin carving/Day of the Dead celebration play date. (I must admit, these blended cultural celebrations are truly some of my favorites as they are the perfect reflection of how all the mixed families out there (and not solely multicultural families but also people who love incorporating diverse cultural elements into a celebration) create traditions.  Read more »

The Influence of Bilingual Preschool Teachers

Lately, both of my girls have taken to calling my youngest, Lila, “Lilita.” Although they do not attend a bilingual Spanish preschool, two of the three teachers are native Spanish speakers. While they have Spanish class on Fridays, the influence of Spanish extends beyond the songs and words they learn on that day. The Spanish diminutive has crept into their English vocabulary with ease.  Read more »

The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep

We have a weird relationship to babies and sleep in the West. I was reminded of this when I spoke to my German sister-in-law recently. She had just arrived back in Germany from Spain, where she was visiting her little sister who had just had a baby. My sister-in-law commented that the baby was great, except “she doesn’t sleep in her bed, only in the arms, so that’s a little hard.  Read more »

The Economics of Bilingualism

Not everyone has the same reasons for raising bilingual children. For some, it is necessity: a language particular to the country you're in, your family language, your parent's language. For my family, our kids learning Arabic is a necessity. Arabic is their father's native tongue and the language half their relatives speak. Not teaching them would be unthinkable.  Read more »
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Why I Travel 13 Hours Alone with My Kids Every Chance I Get

Travelling with children, while definitely more of a mission, contradicts the old saying that “life is about the journey, not the destination.”

A Diverse Book for Preschoolers in Celebration of Multicultural Children's Book Day

A book that honestly and simply celebrates the every day diversity that children experience.

Why My African Feminist Mother Gave Me the Identity of My Father's Tribe

She gave me an identity so different from her own.

2 Children’s Books about Jamaica

Explore Jamaica with your child.

Costa Rica with Kids: Two Weeks of Family Travel

Two weeks of Pura Vida in a country with so much to offer families.

Should I Worry about My Child's Accent in Her Foreign Language?

See why Dr. Gupta takes offense to this question and where children learn accents from

How to raise trilingual kids when exposure to Dad's language is limited

My kids only get 1-2 hours of the minority language per day-help!

What Cultural Norms Around Bare Feet Taught This Mother in Guatemala

Her baby's bare feet ended up being a lesson on poverty and privilege.

Why We Need to Read Multicultural Children's Books

Children need to see the world around them reflected in books.

How My Two Year Old is Teaching Me Thai

I am just another "farang" or stranger until my son starts speaking fluent Thai

10 Things You Should Know Before Adopting a Child

What you may want to consider before sending in that adoption application.

10 Best Children's Books for Gifts

Our Editors favorite multicultural books for this holiday season.

Will Three Languages Confuse a Young Child?

My wife thinks three languages will confuse our child. Is she right?

11 African-American Children’s Books for Christmas and Kwanzaa

Try a few of these from this fantastic selection of African-American holiday books

What I Can Do as a White Mom After Darren Wilson’s Acquittal

How do I explain to my kids the racism that does not come in the form of explicit laws and overt, blatant prejudice?

10 Multicultural Children’s Books that Make Adults Cry

We dare you to read these without a tear

Why This Mom Banned the Word ‘Weird’ From Her Kids' Vocabulary

One approach to explaining diversity to kids.

French versus Italian Parenting in One Multicultural Family

How one mom in an intercultural marriage sees the differences between Italian and French parenting

The Cultural Battleground of Sleepovers

Should they be allowed because it's "normal?" Think again.

Are Parents Too Overprotective in the West and Too Lax in the East?

Would you pick up a stranger's child or is that invasive?

Does Religion Matter? Juggling Two Faiths in One Family

What's the best way to transmit the values we care about to our kids?

Amazing Portraits of Biracial Kids

Smarter, larger, better, healthier and more beautiful? A project that debunks stereotypes.

Dear White Officer, Please Don't Shoot

At what age does my darling black son begin to look like a threat to the world?

A Book that Celebrates Cross-Cultural Friendship

A great pick for back to school season

My Daughter’s 10 Favorite Multicultural Books

Does your shelf have these kid favorites?

I was Diagnosed with Cancer at Age 37 while Abroad with Kids

Illness in a foreign country can be scary but it taught this mom a different meaning of family.

Huge Giveaway for Eid: Tea Collection, Little Passports, Little Pim, Dolls, Books, Music & More

Win almost $300 in prizes from awesome globally-inspired children's products.

5 Smoothies Your Kids Will Love

Healthy smoothies for summer your kids will like.

3 Beautiful Children’s Books That Take Place in the Himalayas

Beautiful children's stories from Nepal to Tibet

Why African Toddlers Don't Have Tantrums

The secret of why African babies don't meltdown like Western ones.

How I Made My Forgotten Native Language My Child’s Strongest

I started off by speaking dodgy Cantonese. No word for remote control? No problem! ‘Pressy thingy.’

Help Us Giveaway a Soccer Ball to Kids in Ethiopia!

Let's donate a ball to kids who need it in Ethiopia. Here's how you can help!

Tanabata Festival: July 7

A beautiful Japanese summer festival

Homemade Art Books for Ramadan

A simple homemade gift for kids

A Children's Book for Global Citizens: Everyone Prays

A celebration of faith around the world through simple text and rich illustrations.

Do I Hold My Son Back to Get into the Immersion Program?

What would you do? Your child won a place in the lottery, only problem is it's the wrong year!

After Her Husband’s Tragic Death, She Embraced a Religion and Culture Not Her Own

This Japanese mom embraced Judaism to give her son a piece of his father
[…] the breastfeeding culture in Mongolia compared to America. Did you have any idea that something as simple as breastfeeding attitudes can […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
My mother born in the 1930's is originally from the northern part of Germany. I am in my mid fifties and have a terrible relationship with my mother. She is domineering and hurts those where it hurt...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
[…] JC Niala, InCultureParent […...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
[…] […...
From Breastfeeding Around the World
Although humanity is one Man (in a generic sense, including woman)has identified himself endless groups, religious, nationalistic, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, etc. Once you separate ME from YOU on...
From What’s an Asian? Race and Identity for a New Generation
[…] […...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
Some great tips here but not many working mothers could feed baby every hour especially if you work in a major multi-nationa...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
So true!!! Thanks for being so honest and self reflective. It's a proof of true characte...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
As a first-time mom I've spent the last two months of my four-month-old's life stressed out about her sleep and I recognize how crazy this is. It's clearly not working for me! I'm wondering how non-...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
[…]        […...
From Why African Toddlers Don’t Have Tantrums
[…] Any content provided on this blog is opinion based with selected information from various sources where indicated. Image:
From Imbolc Craft: St. Brigid’s Cross
Or you could have had a beautiful white baby with a man from your own culture. Not enough drama in tha...
From How I Reclaimed My House from My Mother-in-Law
Crystal, thanks for sharing your experiences. It makes for a fascinating read! The link to the Siddha school you provided seems to be no longer working. Is the school still ther...
From How I Moved to Thailand with my Family on Less than $1000
[…] but which colour to choose? Biome has 25% off storewide till midnight tonight with the code BIOME25 why African babies don’t cry – an absolutely brilliant […...
From Why African Babies Don’t Cry
[…] […...
From 6 Children’s Books to Celebrate Juneteenth
I love this website and its insight on raising global citizens. I agree with what you say about no one English accent being correct - the thing that I was surprised by in this article was the fact ...
From Should I Worry about My Child’s Accent in Her Foreign Language?
Why are Germans thinking about being rude? Do You All want to be Just A Coarse-Face? If all of you deviate from Universalism, there is much more to fear from the world than you expec...
From Are Germans Really Rude?
[…] 3 Children’s Books from the Himalayas at InCultureParent […...
From 3 Beautiful Children’s Books That Take Place in the Himalayas
[…] How I Talk to My Kindergarten Classroom About Race […...
From How I Talk to My Kindergarten Classroom About Race
[…] don’t Need a Room. The baby room is certainly a modern invention. For much of history, and in other parts of the world today, babies […...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Addressing the "grown up time" someone mentioned sure that many people address this differently with what works for their family. However, suffice it to say that when the baby's in your...
From The African Guide to Co-sleeping
[…] were taught to whistle – but other people use other sounds. Most people seem to shush or to hiss. It doesn’t really matter. You could probably sing “La Cucaracha” and it would stil...
From Thanks to Chinese Potty-Training We’re Done With Diapers at 19 Months
Thanks for the article! I tried to put my newborn twins into a bassinet at birth, but there was just no way! No way to breastfeed and no way to survive the nights with two of them waking me up all...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Olga, witam!:) what a fresh approach this has given me on such a day like today! I'm Half polish being polish from my mothers side and as this is the language that I ident myself with, I decided to ...
From 10 Things Not to Say to Parents of Multilingual Children
[…] the talk at school. You can see an example of bilingual twins’ language use in this article from InCultureParent and this Q&A on Twins List. Also, as you say, convincing them to spea...
From Si­, Yes: Raising Bilingual Twins
Thank you SOO much for sharing!!!! I have breastfed my twins for 3 years now and still going. It has been a struggle, especially with family members like my mother in law who wished I weaned at 2 m...
From Breastfeeding in the Land of Genghis Khan
[…] The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep […...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
I aghree with the above comments. Society is reaching a new stages when we all enjoy hearing stories of the beliefs of other...
From Growing Up Baha’i in Rural Maine: A Not-so-Secret Double Life
Hi Kim! I am so glad that this article was useful for you and made you feel validated as a parent. It's not often in this judgmental world of parenting we get that, right?! That's the main reason...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
I love reading your work. I can olny imagine what it would be like to have such beautiful customs and true community. I understand why it is so very very important to keep these traditions alive. Be...
From No Kids Allowed: How Kenyan Weddings are Changing
Your mother in-law seems somewhat reasonable. Many Chinese Mother In-laws are not. In their scenario, they would be number 1 to the child and you would be number two. Many want to have a bond closer...
From How My Chinese Mother-in-Law Replaced my Husband
I think Konstantina is actually responding to what is probably more familiar/praised/or preferred socially as well. I was an English teacher in Poland with a distinct accent. I struggled to get Engl...
From Should I Worry about My Child’s Accent in Her Foreign Language?
Noor Kids' title "First Time Fasting" is another great rea...
From 6 Favorite Children’s Books about Ramadan
This article was shared in a community I run to connect globetrotting parents and everyone LOVED it. You should join us! We all relate to your experience. Many of us, including me, are in the same b...
From Why I Travel 13 Hours Alone with My Kids Every Chance I Get
Please help: I Love my wife and my son. I am also EXTREMELY involved as a dad. I had to move to china ( in a tiny tiny town) where I am the only foreigner so that my wife can take over the family bu...
From How My Chinese Mother-in-Law Replaced my Husband
Thanks for writing this!! My baby is 7 months, and I love having her sleep in my room. I don't mention it too often to people who have had kids because they seem a little judgy on it. So tonight I...
From The West’s Strange Relationship to Babies and Sleep
Honestly, it looks like the author married into a very backward and old fashioned family. Not stimulating children's curiosity, differences between boys and girls, and women slaving in the house, wh...
From French versus Italian Parenting in One Multicultural Family
[…] B. Breasts are for Babies? Perceptions of Breastfeeding in Italy. In Culture Parent June […...
From Breasts are for Babies? Perceptions of Breastfeeding in Italy
[…] that “beatings” are not actually spankings. There may be some truth to this because African tribal culture does not support “spanking”. This is confirmed by my own observation in S...
From African Parenting: The Sane Way to Raise Children
[…] Pomlazka, a special handmade whipping stick, is an Easter tradition in the Czech Republic. Made out of pussywillow tigs, pomlazka is braided and then used by the village boys/men to “...
From What’s Easter without a Whipping?