Hungry for Some Korean Bee-Bim Bop

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When we started investigating a Korean-themed book to cover in May, the suggestion that came up over and over from many Korean-Americans and others was Bee-Bim Bop, by author Linda Sue Park and illustrator Ho Baek Lee, so we took heed. Bee-Bim Bop is an adorable, sing-songy book about cooking this favorite (at least one of my favorite) Korean dishes, bee-bim bop, which means mixed-up rice in Korean. The book was also chosen in 2009 by the public libraries of New York as one of the top 20 favorite stories to read aloud and I can see why.

 

The book begins with a trip to the grocery store, after which mother and daughter return home to cook. The book introduces us, through rhyme, to the ingredients that go into making bee-bim bop and shows a little girl helping her mom in the kitchen including cleaning up her spilled water and setting the table; books that demonstrate helping and working together are always a plus in my mind.

 

The main verse woven throughout (with a few variations):

 

“Hungry hungry hungry

for some bee-bim bop”

 

is guaranteed to have your kids repeating it! But unlike other stories with a potentially annoying refrain, it was pretty cute to hear my non-Korean-speaking kids going around chanting “bee-bim bop.” The book ends with the parents, their two kids and a grandmother mixing up their bee-bim bop around the dinner table.

 

An added bonus is a recipe for bee-bim bop at the end of the book, crafted in a way for you to make it with your kids; it’s directed to “you” and includes cooking instructions for a “grown-up.” I can’t wait to see if this book will have an influence on my kids eating bee-bim bop next time we eat Korean food.

2 COMMENTS

  1. […] The Sam Taeguk symbol is found on traditional Korean fans. It is a variation of the Taeguk symbol found on the Korean national flag. The Taeguk is comprised of two colors, red and blue. The red represents heaven and the blue represents earth. The symbol represents harmony similar to a yin yang symbol. The Sam Taeguk includes yellow to represent humanity. The Sam Taegeuk also appeared in the official logo of the 1988 Summer Olympics. To make your own Sam Taeguk Fan, you can follow these directions below. For more Korean crafts for kids, check out the end of this article! Materials: Paint (blue, yellow and red) Paintbrushes Popsicle sticks Glue Scissors Template for the fan (click here for the Sam Taeguk template. Instructions: Print out the template and cut it out. Let the kids paint the template with yellow, red and blue paints. Once dry, glue a popsicle stick to the back, and there you have it—your very own traditional Korean fan! Submitted by Mama King over at the kid’s crafting website, Four Kings. If you are looking for more Korean crafts, check out these: Make a sogo drum–a “lollipop”-shaped drum often used by children in Korea Make a Lotus Lantern Need a fun Korean-themed book for kids? Check out Hungry for Some Bee Bim Bop. […]

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